Water Programs

Council has achieved significant water savings through several water conservation projects.

Please find below information on several water-related topics:

    Water Restrictions in Melbourne

    Permanent Water Use Rules are now in force. Permanent water use rules apply to hand watering, watering systems, window washing, pools and spas, and fountains and water features, to name a few.

    You can visit Yarra Valley Water for information on Melbourne’s current water restrictions.

    Integrated Water Management Plan

    In May 2014, Council adopted an Integrated Water Management Plan:

    Integrated Water Management Plan (pdf, 8MB)

    The plan documents Council's vision and goals for integrated water management, and sets targets and recommendations to guide future strategic policy development and action.

    The vision and themes are: "Water is integrated into all Council service areas to ensure a connected and healthy community and environment. The vision is articulated through five themes: social health, ecological health, connected communities, shared prosperity and water sensitive infrastructure".

    Water Tanks

    Monash has installed over 50 rainwater tanks at Council facilities for garden and tree watering, toilet flushing and vehicle and machinery washing. The rainwater tanks have resulted in water savings of over 10 million litres.

    Tanks were installed in the machine wash bays at the Council Depot in 2007. Since then the Depot has saved over 5,500 L of potable water.
    In 2011, tanks were installed at Alvie Hall, Batesford Hub Community Centre, Fregon Hall, Gardiner's Reserve and the Men's Shed.

    Installing rainwater tanks is the best way to beat the imposed water restrictions and save on water costs at the same time.  The storm water harvesting at Mt Waverley Reserve, installed in 2012, is expected to reduce potable water consumption by 80%.  This storm water harvesting system is to be connected to irrigation systems for the Mt Waverley sports fields, adjacent tennis courts and toilet flushing.

    The storm water will supplement 10 ML of water each year.

    Storm water Harvesting

    The storm water harvesting at Mt Waverley Reserve, installed in 2012, is expected to reduce potable water consumption by 80%.

    This storm water harvesting system is to be connected to irrigation systems for the Mt Waverley sports fields, adjacent tennis courts and toilet flushing.  The storm water will supplement 10 ML of water each year.

    Warm Season Grass

    Council has introduced drought-tolerant grasses at more than 15 sports fields.  This saves an average of 2 million litres of water per hectare in comparison to traditional grass species.

    Wetland Rehabilitation

    Council will improve water within existing wetlands to ensure ongoing water quality improvements.

    A wetland Management Plan has been drawn for Herriotts Boulevard Wetland, in order to improve water flows, silt quality, litter management and wetland vegetation.

    Living Roof Project

    The purpose of the vegetated roof is to allow Monash University, supported by Melbourne Water, to test the quality of the storm water discharging from the roof and measuring the reduction in roof rainwater run-off.

    The project proposal involved retrofitting the existing concrete roof of the council chambers to an extensive living roof or "vegetated" roof. The plants will be drought tolerant ground covers. It insulates and cools the building, reducing energy expenditure and carbon emissions. Other benefits include reducing storm water runoff and intensity by 90%, and increasing biodiversity.

    Water Watch

    The City of Monash is a regional sponsor of Water watch, a national community water quality monitoring program run by the Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) in-conjunction with Melbourne Water.

    Through Water watch, groups can test and monitor the quality of water in our creeks and streams, link with each other, share discoveries, compare findings and build a picture of the health of waterways across Australia.

    School or community groups wanting to undertake water quality monitoring need to first attend a short training session. A monitoring kit is available for loan from Council for groups who have undertaken this training.

    Water watch Victoria

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      Last updated: 09 January 2017